A Busy Band

“It’s a good activity to get your mind off of school and make more friends.”

The+band+stands+ready+to+perform+their+show+after+this+years+homecoming+game.

Craig Forant

The band stands ready to perform their show after this year’s homecoming game.

Logan Bishop, Online Editor

Roberto Velasco, age 17, is a senior and the percussion captain for the school band.

Between band camp in the summer, competitions almost every weekend, and practice four days a week, the students in band have a lot on their chest. Despite this, Velasco said it doesn’t interfere with his studies. In fact, he even added to say, “I find myself performing academically better while band season is going on. There is time before practice where everyone is silent and you can complete your school work peacefully.”

While the band can be quiet while they work on their studies, that doesn’t hold them back from performing on the field.

Competitions start the second week of October for about a month. “Football games help prepare us for competitions during halftime shows. It’s the first time we get to go out on the field,” Velasco said. “Continuous rehearsals and hard individual work allows us to memorize our music and our sets to give the best performance possible at competitions,” drum major Jorel Padilla said.

Last year, the band placed third at Tarpon Springs and won the East Lake competition. Not only that, our hurricane band performed at the Atlanta Bands of America Super Regionals against the top 40 bands in all states for the first time.

Now, mistakes are common. The band isn’t always perfect. “The number one thing to do when a mistake occurs is to remain confident and try to remember the musical phrase we are current in,” Padilla said.

To make sure these mistakes aren’t a reoccurrence, band students practice every Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, as well as some Saturday’s.

Not only do the members have to learn the music, they have to learn band choreography.

“The last competition of the year is when everything comes together and you realize what you’ve been working for,” Velasco said. “You’re constantly moving.”

These competitions generally last from seven in the morning to seven at night. Bands warm-up and practice for around one hour before they drive to the performance area to play their hearts out.

There is five different divisions in the competitions, with smaller bands performing in 1A and 2A divisions. Palm Harbor performs in the 3A division.

While the band students strive to be the best in high school, most of them have plans to continue with college band or to join a professional marching band. “I’m not going to waste 7 years of band for nothing,” Velasco said.

This year, the band has been practicing hard to prepare for future competitions and they are hoping to bring home a few more trophies to make our school and family proud.